Agreement On Declaration Of Principles On The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Project

The delegate of the Russian Federation said that the search for a mutually acceptable solution to the problem should be carried out in accordance with the spirit and letter of the 2015 Khartoum Declaration, taking into account the progress made on a number of issues, from the backfilling of the dam to the safety of the project. The recent meeting of the African Union had given rise to a promising format of cooperation — a tripartite committee on technical and legal issues, which dealt with all outstanding issues in dam operation. He drew attention to the contributions of African States to the elimination of differences between the three nations and said that African colleagues had demonstrated their commitment to the principle of „African Solutions to African Problems“. He expressed the hope that Addis Ababa, Cairo and Khartoum will be able to reach a mutually acceptable agreement, in the interest of maintaining stability in the region, and said that the elimination of disputes depends on negotiations that respect the interests of all parties and are in accordance with international law. The Russian Federation is very keen for the problem to be resolved quickly, as it would contribute to the progress, development and prosperity of the African continent, in line with the objectives set at the first Russia-Africa Economic Forum and Summit held in Sochi in 2019. Sameh Shoukry, Egypt`s foreign minister, said that like how the world is working together to deal with the global COVID-19 pandemic, this issue requires the same spirit of cooperation, while recognizing that no nation is an island in itself, but is part of a community bound by a common destiny. While acknowledging the importance of the project to Ethiopia`s development goals, he said Africa`s largest mega-hydroelectric dam potentially threatens the well-being, well-being and existence of millions of Egyptian and Sudanese citizens. In fact, 100 million Egyptians depend on the waterway to support themselves. The unilateral backfilling and operation of this dam in the absence of an agreement that would include provisions to protect downstream communities would exacerbate tensions and could provoke crises and conflicts that further destabilize the already troubled region.

The Estonian representative said that the issue of the Great Ethiopian Renaissance Dam could only be resolved by mutual agreement through direct discussions and understanding between the three countries concerned. He asked them to stay the course and encouraged them to continue negotiations in good faith, make the necessary concessions and reach a mutually beneficial tripartite agreement. . . .